5 Reasons Why I Should Spay or Neuter My Pet?

This approach will make your pet a more contented member of your household….

5 reasons why i should spay or neuter my pet? Dogs are naturally affectionate and need people because they’re domestic animals, but sadly, the drive for reproduction overpowers that natural affection. In response to this instinct to mate, dogs start to behave aggressively, excessively bark, howl, and other unwanted behaviors. Getting neutered frees your pet of the urge and the resulting unwanted behaviors, making your pet more calm and focused on you.Probably the best part about neutering your pets is that they get along so much better together.

This will improve the health of your pet.

Pets that have been neutered have less urges to look for mates and are therefore less likely to wander from home and get hurt in fights or killed in traffic.Those pets which have been sterilized are likely to live twice as long as those that are not, partly because they have a lower risk of developing cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate and testes. 

The vet can spay or neuter dogs as early as eight weeks old or at any age beyond that. Females are able to be spayed when they’re in season or very early in a pregnancy, but the risks are higher. (Inform your vet of her condition beforehand.) It is better for both of you to get her spayed before she comes into season the first time. Making an appointment with your veterinarian is the best course of action. A low-cost spay/neuter clinic near you can potentially save you money if expense is a factor. Contact your local humane society for more information.

You don't have to deal with spraying or staining.....

When female dogs and cats are experiencing periods of heat, they circulate a lot of blood. Spay or neuter your pet and eliminate this issue without having to deal with diapers or urine stains on your rugs or furniture. Unneutered male cats can stain your floors and furniture, but this happens all year round, and smells terrible. Male cats that are not neutered must let everyone know that they are interested in defending their territory, so they mark territory by “spraying” objects inside and outside the house with strong smelling urine. When neutered very early, male cats rarely start spraying. Older ones usually stop within months of becoming neutered.

You won't have to fight off suitors.....

You will hear the male dogs or cats for blocks around you when a female goes into heat. Going out with her will feel like fighting. Nothing will scare away the loose male dogs in the neighborhood, so nothing will frighten them. Female dogs are usually in heat twice a year, and they attract males for approximately three weeks. Cats are extremely prolific breeders. Females can mate as often as every two weeks during the breeding season (February through October), and will continue to reproduce unless they’re stopped. They are known to have been in heat while nursing their current litter. Cats that need to mate will be seen wailing, rubbing, and darting out the door. If you don’t want your pet to breed, you might run into trouble. They can almost seem magical in their ability to escape.It’s difficult to get your pets to cooperate because they’re driven by instinct to find a mate. No fenced yard is 100% safe. Dogs can accomplish the impossible when motivated to mate, and the number of puppies conceived in most safely fenced yards number in the hundreds of thousands.

It won't be necessary for you to find homes for the offspring....

Despite seeing the classified ads that promise to make you rich if you breed your pet, you should not count on it. Many of them go unclaimed and end up at shelters or are given away. If your pet is not a purebred, finding a new home for them might be difficult. No matter how purebred your pet is, those puppies or kittens must be mated and registered properly for any chance of profitable breeding.A pedigreed female is even more likely to ruin your plans by mating with a mutt or an alley cat when that happens.

5 Reasons Why I Should Spay or Neuter My Pet?

You won't have to spend extra money.....

Purebred or not, it is expensive to bring a healthy litter into the world. The mother will require periodic veterinary checks and a special diet during her pregnancy. Healthcare expenses can mount if the mother suffers any issues during the pregnancy or delivery, or if her puppies or kittens have health issues.In eight weeks, the young will not be able to leave their home, which means two months of housing, cleaning, and feeding them. They will also need to be vaccinated by a veterinarian before being sold. A lot of money is spent on advertising and showing potential buyers the animals, in addition to the expenses related to the phone calls. In addition to the additional guilt you carry in selling a puppy or kitten to a home where he may be neglected, mistreated, abandoned, or abused, if you don’t screen the buyers carefully. One of the most heartbreaking decisions of all is choosing what to do with the puppies and kittens you have that you cannot find homes for.

When should I spay or neuter my pet?

For decades, the answer was easy, six months for cats and dogs. No thought necessary. Then, shelters started encouraging spaying and neutering earlier and earlier to try and reduce the number of unwanted pets.  However, they did not make this decision based on medical science, so problems are now emerging.

What is known?

Female dogs and cats are almost completely eliminated from their long-term risk of getting mammary tumors (breast cancer) if they are spayed before the first heat cycle. Roughly half of all tumors in women are malignant. 90% of cats’ breast tumours are malignant, but spaying dogs before their first heat cycle reduces the risk to less than a 1/10th of a 1% (0.05%). Spaying during the first heat cycle reduces the risk, however, the difference is not as big. It is common for dogs to go into heat around seven months, and slightly later in large breeds. We have to euthanize dogs and cats with mammary tumors on a yearly basis. Many pets who don’t get regular checkups present with advanced cancer when they do, leading you to incur greater medical expenses and sometimes treatment’s too late.

We know from human and dog studies that pregnancy, as a young adult, carries less lifetime risk for mammary tumors than delayed pregnancy, so delaying spaying for a dog intended for breeding is not necessarily bad. However you will have to find homes for all of those puppies.

In addition, it is well known that dogs and cats, after cycling back and forth between heats, but without getting bred, can start to develop abnormal tissue in the uterus. This can result in life-threatening uterine infections.Although surgical treatment is generally effective, it is also more expensive and more dangerous than a routine spay as an adult. If you procrastinate on seeking adequate veterinary care, you may find yourself facing thousands of dollars in medical bills.The Urbana Veterinary Clinic sees this condition every few years. It is 100% avoidable by spaying.

However, we have learned new lessons with the early spay/neuter ‘experiment’. The findings and research are still being revised.

In a recent clinical study at the University of California, Davis veterinary school, 759 golden retrievers were evaluated for orthopedic and cancer risk factors. There is a strong association between neutering before one year of age and increased risk of hip dysplasia (a condition also influenced by genetics, diet, and exercise) and cruciate ligament tears (which may require costly surgery) and lymphosarcoma. Female dogs, however, can be at increased risk of mast cell tumors and hemangiosarcoma when neutered after one year of age1.

Additionally, there is a study2 (one of Dr. Cole’s classmates was the lead author) published in 2002. Researchers found that Rottweiler puppies treated before one year of age with spaying or neutering were at increased risk for developing the malignant bone tumor osteosarcoma compared to puppies not spayed or neutered. Spayed and neutered dogs later in life have been shown to be healthier than non-spayed or neutered dogs. However, this study did not specifically look at other breeds.

There is even a study3 that proves that cats neutered before 4 months of age are more likely to develop the rare orthopedic disease Legg Calve Perthes disease. This disease is life-changing, surgery is required to restore some use of the leg. As such pet lovers ask Why Should I Spay or Neuter My Pet? if they will have health issues after.

How does this make sense?

  • A dog under 16 weeks old should not be allowed to be spayed or neutered.
  • A year of age is the recommended age for neutering large breed dogs, unless they are at risk of causing an unwanted pregnancy or displaying aggression.
  • Spaying and neutering cats is recommended around the age of six months.
  • Dogs between the ages of 6 and 12 months should be spayed. 
  •      Usually, we take into consideration her size, breed, and any known family history of disease when deciding when to cycle, in addition to the risk of an unwanted pregnancy.

  •     In general, spaying a small dog from 6 months of age, a large dog can possibly be spayed a little later.

  • A dog’s age is 6-12 months, and it is recommended that the male be neutered between this time.
  • It is no longer recommended to spay or neuter a dog or cat less than 6 months of age.
  • New evidence will continue to be collected as new recommendations are put forth.

The above article try to give you vivid description of the ills of having unplanned litters running up and down your 2 bedroom apartment. It takes a lot of time and planning to decide if you wish to become a breeder.Why Should I Spay or Neuter My Pet? is a very broad topic and we will keep updating our readers with new update. For more information about weimaraner puppies, You should check our other papges for more information or contact us directly.

2 Replies to “5 Reasons Why I Should Spay or Neuter My Pet?”

  1. Thanks for explaining how spaying your pet can prevent reproductive organ cancers and overpopulation. I have a friend who’s thinking of adopting a small kitten from her teacher. I hope this can convince her to take the kitten to a veterinarian for this treatment once they’re old enough.

    1. Thanks Zachary, It is very important to understand the need to spay or neuter your pets when they are of age. I hope she listen to your advice.

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